Information Stories

clip_image002That will soon be the title of this blog. I’ve registered the domain. I’ve mulled it around in my head and that’s the best I could come up with. Well, it’s not the best but technologyStories.com is a premium domain and GoDaddy wants $2,588.00 for it. Sorry. Not happening. Besides, it’s not about technology, it’s about information. Really, it’s about people, but this isn’t where I want to write about people. The fact of the matter is that it’s about inflection points.

SharePoint is at an inflection point. It went from being a hot new product to a must have product to, or at least it’s approaching being a legacy product. I should have known better when I named this blog. I’ve been in this industry for my entire career and technology is ongoing, but no single technology really has the staying power worthy of a domain name. It’s OK, the name had a good ride and if I manage the transition well enough, I’ll keep a few of you as readers. After all, you didn’t come here for my SharePoint knowledge. My favorite comment ever on this blog is “I like that you explore the ‘why’ behind the solutions.” The ‘why’ by the way is people.

I write about ECM and content a lot, but Content Management is at an inflection point. Some people say that it is past the inflection point. But, those are marketing types. Marketing types are always ahead of the curve with regard to change. Marketing types want to use terms at the moment of peak hype and then relegate them to the dustbin of ‘legacy’. Marketing types have had SharePoint and ECM in the rearview mirror for quite some time. I can tell ECM is in the mirror because ecmStories.com is available for 12 bucks.

I also write about process. People, process and technology are the things I’m told we need to focus on, and specifically in that order. I know that. I’ve always known that. OK, I haven’t always known that but I was told that when I asked:

“Why do I have to take The Psychology of Business when I’m studying Operations Research?” The answer was: “Because you’re going to be dealing with people.

Operations Research, by the way, was all about process. I love process but the instructor was right, it really is about people. ProcessStories.com is available, but is has those 3 s’s in a row and it sounds dumb. And really, who wants to read about process. Process is boring and belongs behind the scenes where it can’t hurt anybody.

So, Dan, why don’t you call it peopleStories.com? Well, there are two reasons: 1) peopleStories.com is not available. peopleStories.info is but, again, dumb. 2) I’m not qualified to write about people. 3) Wait, you said there were two reasons. I know, but 3) I write about people and my thoughts and ideas as they relate to people on No Facilities. See, I needed a third point to plug my other blog.

I write from my experience. My most recent experience is being collected at ANI. ANI is at an inflection point. We are planning for the retirement of a bunch of senior folks who have information in their heads. We are simultaneously planning to support a bunch of younger folks who want to be able to find that information without having to live in it. But, I can’t really talk that much about ANI.

So then, Information?

Yes, information. Because that’s what people need most, and that’s what I do. That’s what I’ve always done. I have spent over 35 years finding ways to put data into context in order to create information and then to give people access to that information in a way that helps them to perform their business process.

Technology will continue to morph itself from file shares to SharePoint to a different kind of file share (DropBox, Box, ShareFile, OneDrive, iCloud – I have one of each of these) and onto other things once people discover (again) that file shares don’t really work and that search (alone) doesn’t really work. Dropbox and all the Dropbox wanna-be’s of the world will add metadata to their product, and the marketing folks will give it a clever sounding name and some dumb kid will create a blog using that word. A few months later, the marketers will tag the word as passé and a few years later, the industry will be calling it legacy and the dumb kid will be searching GoDaddy.

Thanks for reading this blog for over 5 years. I’ll be making the turn soon, and I hope to keep you on board.

Blah blah InfoPath blah blah

imageWow, has anything ever attracted as much attention as Microsoft’s decision to kill a mediocre product? My inbox is full of “InfoPath is Dead” and “Microsoft is Killing InfoPath” emails. I’ve seen Tweets, Facebook posts, invitations to join discussions on LinkedIn and invitations to attend Webinars practically every single day since the announcement was made. I get it! InfoPath will die in 2023. Guess what, I will retire before then.

The fact that I will be retired before then really won’t be considered as input to our decisions regarding InfoPath usage. As it stands today, we are making limited use of InfoPath in a fairly important project. In addition, we have plans to use InfoPath in a slightly larger, more important project later this year. I don’t see us changing these plans. Here’s why:

2023 – 2014 = 9 Years – Seriously, 9 years! That’s a long time. It’s not like “ding dong the witch is dead; click your shoes and go home.” The metaphorical Dorothy will be old enough to drink by the time she gets back to Kansas. We made an investment in InfoPath, and well before 2023, we will have achieved a return on that investment. That is what we are supposed to do isn’t it?

What’s on Other Roadmaps? – I realize that there are other ways to publish and process forms. Some of these alternatives are every bit as good as InfoPath, many are superior. If you made me choose a new forms platform today, I would probably start by taking a hard look at Nintex. We use Nintex’s workflow product and I imagine their form product works well too. That said, what’s Nintex’s plan for the future? Will Nintex Forms exist in 2023? Will the forms we produce with Nintex Forms today still run in 2023? Well, we really don’t know. In terms of vendors you can trust for the long haul, there really aren’t many. It’s not like they are untrustworthy, but what company can really say that they and their products will be here in 10 years? HP? Dell? BlackBerry (RIM)? Kodak? Go back 10 years and think about how those guys looked at the time and then consider how they look today. If you’ve been reading this blog, you might be surprised to see me say that I trust Microsoft, but when they say that they put something on a long, supported slide to the back door, I think we can believe them.

Now, let’s take a look at those scary emails. Here are some of the things they are warning me about and why I’m not concerned:

Support and Compatibility Questions Abound – Sure they do, but when haven’t they? Microsoft says that InfoPath 2013 will be the last version and support will end in April of 2023. As far as I know, they didn’t actually say that InfoPath 2013 and SharePoint 20nn will be compatible, but I’m not going to worry about that. Let’s assume that the next version of SharePoint is the 2016 version (I know they want to stop the “big release thing” but humor me). Chances are good that SharePoint 2016 will be compatible with InfoPath 2013. Chances are also good that we could run SharePoint 2016 until 2020 (we’re still running SharePoint 2010). Since we know that InfoPath is on a collision course with the trash bin in 2023, I’m pretty sure that my successors will have an alternative in mind before 2020. I don’t think they will be building any new InfoPath Forms in 2018-2020, but I think we can safely build them in 2014-2016 and still get that ROI.

No Certain Migration Path – In other words what if Microsoft creates a new Forms product and we can’t convert our InfoPath forms to that product. Well, that would be dumb. If Microsoft wants to play in the forms arena, they would be silly to alienate their previous forms customers. Still, since we know that Microsoft is capable of doing dumb things, I’ll accept this as a possibility. On the other hand, you have to ask: is there a way to migrate one forms product today to another forms product today? I am assuming that if we wanted to move to Nintex Forms today, we’d be recreating the functionality of our InfoPath forms on that platform. That’s OK. Also, that’s really the worst thing that can happen to us, that in 5-7 years we will have to recreate a form that probably will be due for a major update anyway.

A member of my team will be at the SharePoint Conference. We will hear about the future of InfoPath from the horse, and we will plan or adjust our plans accordingly. In the meantime, I’m not losing any sleep.

Butcher, Baker, Candlestick Maker

Marc, Chris and RogerA few days ago, the AIIM New England chapter held its final event of the program year. The event title suggested three disparate topics: “Cloud, Mobile content management and BYOD”, but we quickly were made to understand that these topics are deeply intertwined. In addition, it became apparent that the panel we assembled for this discussion understood the ways in which the challenges these topics present are not new, not different and that this is not the last time we will see them.

Our panel included Roger Bottum – VP of Marketing, SpringCM; Christopher J Luise – Executive VP, ADNET Technologies and Marc D. Anderson – Co-Founder and President of Sympraxis Consulting. Regular readers of this blog know that Marc trades under the Twitter handle of @sympmarc and Chris’ business thoughts can be found under @ITwithValue although I prefer the bacon-laced tweets from @cluise. Roger’s insight can be tapped at @springCM, a recent add to my daily twitter feed. We chose this group with the thought that a vendor, an integrator and a consultant would be able to give three different views on the subject. I’m not sure if it was the combination, or the fact that these guys were not actual competitors (like some of our previous panels) or perhaps that we just got lucky and picked three brilliant speakers, but this was an awesome panel.

I scrawled notes and quotes across 10 pages while trying to juggle a comment and question feed from a streaming audience that was almost the size of the group gathered in the room. I can’t recap everything, but just the opening thoughts were enough to tell me this panel wasn’t going to stay on the rails:

Roger: “Mobile is not an option, it’s here. The cloud isn’t a question of ‘if’; it’s a question of ‘when’ and ‘how’”.

Chris: “Connecting to the enterprise has always been possible, it’s just been clunky. Now, scale has come to the market and most companies have been caught on their back foot.”

Marc: “This technology has always been around, just not everywhere – now it is” Marc also added my favorite quote of the event “By the way, the ‘D’ in BYOD stands for device, not disaster.”

These and a few other common threads dominated the technical current running through this meeting. The notion that we have been dealing with the problems of integrating new devices, securing new devices and adapting to new technologies forever, was prevalent throughout the discussion. The thing that made this discussion so fascinating was the absolute pragmatism that was evident in their collective point of view. When a question was asked about controlling a cloud-based solution or controlling a cadre of mobile devices, the answer was fast and sharp – “to assume that you have control today is a false assumption!” It’s not some brave new world that we are entering into; it’s the next phase of an evolutionary process that involves a broader audience.

One of the most spirited portions of the discussion came after a question from a member of our streaming audience, asking about the fact that people are now carrying a laptop, an iPad and a smartphone instead of a single device. The attendee wondered how corporate IT was going to make this a better experience. Ironically, I was sitting there with those three devices, and the question kicked off a series of responses that ranged from the suggestion that my laptop was inadequate to the fact that today’s solutions have to driven by a combination of Capability, Form Factor and User Experience. That seemed to be enough to light the fuse on the philosophical side of this meeting, which was a powerfully refreshing discussion. Again, I can offer a few quotes:

Roger: “If someone doesn’t think it (your solution) works better than the old solution, it’s not going to be supported.”

Marc: “IT is not spending enough time asking users what they want and what they need to do their job. IT is more concerned about writing a BYOD policy than they are about getting people the data they need.

Chris added some thoughts that seem to indicate that the key vendors in this space are fueling the fire toward a trend that supports their own objectives.

Apple wants to sell devices, Microsoft wants to sell applications that are going to work on all (wink) devices and Oracle (yes, he said Oracle) wants you to believe that only the data really matters.

The event ended with a major challenge to companies and particularly those of us in IT:

Give your users the tools they need to meet the increasing demands you are placing on them.

I don’t know who offered the suggestion that problem facing practitioners is to find a way to meet technical, cultural, and procedural challenges in an integrated manner – and to meet those challenges quickly. Of course, the panel members quickly added that meeting those challenges isn’t really a new task.

Consultant Chronicle

clip_image002As long as I have published SharePoint Stories, I have been asking my friend and colleague Mark Thompson to make a guest appearance. Mark is a busy guy, and so far, that guest post hasn’t happened. During this same timeframe, Mark has been talking to me about an idea he and a friend (Bill Kelly) of his have had for a blog that would include a series of interviews published as podcasts. I am very happy to say that that idea has come to fruition in the form of the Consultant Chronicle.

I will be honest here, when I first heard of this idea I had two thoughts: 1) Mark’s plan was very ambitions and I wasn’t sure it could be done. Knowing how much effort goes into publishing a quality blog (you do think this is a quality blog…right?), I just couldn’t see how they could make this happen. Recording an interview, cleaning that up and publishing it – it sounded like too much work. 2) Would I really want to listen to a podcast of those interviews? Let’s face it, 30 minutes sounds like a long time. Fast forward to the spring of 2011, and I can update both of those thoughts. Mark’s plan was ambitious, but he and Bill have made it happen. Also, 30 minutes flies by when the story line is interesting and these guys keep it interesting; in fact, I am listening to one of the podcasts right now.

I had the good fortune to be one of the early guests on Consultant Chronicle, so I got to see this duo live. I have to tell you, it felt more like a morning radio talk show than a technology interview. Mark and Bill are very knowledgeable, they work very well together and they keep the pace of the show moving toward that 30 minute time limit. More than that, they made me feel very comfortable. I am used to public speaking, but I have only been recorded on a few occasions and the thought still makes me squirm a bit. Mark gave me a brief tour of the studio, introduced me to Bill, mic’d me (forgive my attempt at industry jargon), did a quick sound check and we were off and running. Before I knew it, we were having an enjoyable conversation about my experience at iPhone/iPad DevCon East, and then we were done.

I was surprised when I listened to the podcast, it sounded great, and it was a very interesting experience, because I felt the same energy and emotion that I experienced during the interview. Well, without the nervous feeling on my part. That’s what I have come to really like about these podcasts, you can sense the energy, the way Mark and Bill play off of their guests and you can feel the emotion. When a guest is passionate about a topic, it comes through loud and clear, and that is such an improvement over reading quotes, even the ones that are bolded and italicized. I have listened to an interview with Russ Edleman (ok, that’s not fair, Russ always sounds good), as well as their podcasts on Distance Learning and HIPPA Compliance and I can honestly say, I listened to them from start to finish and I enjoyed the entire show.

I think the most amazing thing about Consultant Chronicle is the fact that these are geeks, interviewing geeks and they all sound great! Mark and Bill have such an amazing collective experience, and their work puts them in contact with some of the region’s most interesting people, that the fodder for this show is rich and abundant. There are a lot of people who do the same kind of work that Mark and Bill do, but I don’t think many of them have the skill set to package their experience in such an easy to consume fashion. I would say that I can’t wait to see a video version, but as they say, some of us have faces for radio.