Short and Sweet

imageAs I indicated earlier in the year, I am doing less of the heavy lifting around our SharePoint space lately. I think I mentioned that this would have an impact on this blog, and well, I think that starts today. I’m not planning to stop or to go to a less frequent editorial schedule but I do have less to say.

I’ll wait for the applause to stop.

Seriously, I can wait.

OK, here’s the first short and sweet SharePoint Story.

One of the things I’ve been doing lately is helping a young woman build a site to store, track and display the results of our upcoming Wellness Contest. I say helping her build, because she is doing all the work. I’m looking over her virtual shoulder (via Lync) but she is navigating the browser, creating the lists and libraries and she is constructing the SharePoint Designer workflows. My contribution is a lot of:

oh, I see why that didn’t work” and “ok, now go back into the browser and try that workflow again…

So far, the most memorable moment for me is when she was terminating a workflow gone haywire and, looking at the workflow results page, said:

These error messages don’t really tell you much do they?

No, no they don’t – Welcome to SharePoint.

This post is about two bits of my personal style that I felt were important enough to pass onto her, and I’m going to refer to one that I’ve already mentioned. Let’s get the reuse out of the way first.

As I said a few weeks ago, I like building multiple small workflows instead of single large ugly workflows. Yes, adding the word “ugly” is a literary technique to skew your opinion toward agreement with mine. I don’t want you to think I’m trying to subtly manipulate you – the manipulation attempt is blatant.

I had a new reason for sharing this technique today though. Having short, single-purpose workflows helps a person build their reference library. Everybody forgets how to do some of the wonderful things they did in an earlier moment of greatness. It’s nice to be able to say “oh, I remember doing that when we did the Wellness contest back in 2014” and to be able to open that workflow and study it. If you open a workflow that scrolls on for several pages, you’ll likely be too confused to gain much benefit.

By the way, in addition to reusing the old thing, that counts as one of my two new things, so I’m almost done.

The second new thing has to do with clarity. Simply put, use more variables. For instance, in the workflow we were working with today, we are processing a step count that arrives by email. If there is an error, we are going to send an email back to the person who sent in the steps. That bit of information is in the Current Item From field, and we could reference it from there. However, I’d rather store it to a variable called “vFrom” and then send the error message to ‘vFrom’ if / when we have to. When we look at that workflow, the variables are visible, readable and the workflow makes a certain amount of sense.

When she finishes this project, I’ll provide a full description here; maybe I’ll even be able to coax her into writing that post. Until then, maybe I’ll actually do some work of my own, or I’ll offer up another short and sweet observation.

2 thoughts on “Short and Sweet

  1. Picture – Our Wellness exercise will focus on steps. Those are the mile-long Indian Trail Steps that were used by workers in Pittsburgh to get between Mt Washington and the west shore of the Monongahela River for work. Inclines were such a better idea. Click on the picture for more information and a much better picture.

  2. Pingback: Impersonation Saves the Day | SharePoint Stories

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