SharePoint Joinery

clip_image002One of the challenging things about working with wood is learning all of the different ways that wood can be joined together. As I said a few weeks ago, it’s not like you can weld it. Joinery is fascinating, labor intensive and meticulous work. The goal is to maximize the surface area for glue and if possible, include a mechanical connection for added strength. I know how to make almost every type of joint, but sometimes I cheat.

If you look at the picture to the right, you will see that it features an interesting joint. With a little fancy cutting, I can create the illusion of a door and a face frame in what is really a solid panel. But, if you look down and to the right, you’ll see a pocket screw.

Pocket screws are a wonderful little cheat. No fancy cutting involved. Drill a hole by running a special kind of bit through a jig, add a bit of glue and whirr whirr whirr, screw the thing together. Fast, easy and ridiculously strong, they only feel like cheating to the guy who knows how to cut the other kind of joints. Email is the pocket screw of SharePoint (see, I do know which blog I’m writing).

Apparently, the fitness freaks in our Human Resources department want us to get healthy. We are going to have an exercise contest where we will form teams, count steps and track calories and the winners will get something like a gift certificate at Dick’s Sporting Goods. Personally, I think that’s like dieting in order to win a case of Tofu, but that’s beside the point. The point is, they want to track this all in SharePoint, which is very cool. Even better, the young woman running the contest wants to build the tracking solution herself. Now that’s exercise I can support.

She will be using a couple of custom lists, some connecting gear and a widget or two:

Team Members – I.E. those of us inclined to walk, run, bike, swim or climb our way to a healthy heart.

Teams – Because some people need a better reason to exercise than living longer. For those people, we introduce peer pressure and the fear of letting your friends down.

Steps – Who, when and how many.

Workflows – She has one that enrolls a person onto a team, and one that adds an individual’s steps to the team total.

Widget – Sooner or later, she’s going to want to make this pretty.

Before we get to making this pretty, she wants to make it easy. I like that. SharePoint should be easy. The problem is that she wants us to walk every day! If we have walk on Saturday and Sunday, we have to have a way to record the steps. We have several:

VPN – Fire up your laptop, connect with VPN, go to the SharePoint site and enter your steps.

Mobile Browser – She’s going to make a nice looking mobile version of the entry page and we will publish that through the MaaS 360 browser. That way, people with iPhones or iPads can enter their steps without having to log in. That’s easy.

Email – Email? Yes, email. SharePoint can receive email. SharePoint workflows can “read” emails and I can enter my steps in a dirt-simple process.

To: TheSharePointLibraryAcceptingSteps@ourDomain.com
From: Me
Subject: Steps 06/01/2014 12,500

I’m going to walk a lot in June.

clip_image004That’s easy to do, and with the help of those HarePoint Extensions for SharePoint workflows, it will be easy to build. HarePoint is like the jig that helps me angle those pocket screws into position.

We use email in several processes where connecting something to SharePoint would otherwise require the equivalent of a hand-cut dovetail. For example, we have a process where SharePoint needs to know about a status change that results from a SQL Server stored procedure. Connecting SharePoint to SQL Server is possible, but running workflows on External Lists is not – the data isn’t in SharePoint. Fortunately, SQL Server can send SharePoint an email and we can read that email.

Of course, SharePoint can send email too. So, if one of our employees doesn’t include enough information on the subject line of that email, our workflow can write them back:

Yo, Stepper. We’re thrilled that you’re getting some exercise, but we do need three things to make those steps count. Please include the word ‘step’ (or steps, or Steppenwolf), an mm/dd/yyyy formatted date and the number of steps on the subject line of your email. They can be in any order, but we need all three.

Thanks,
Step counting robot

Sure, there are other ways to connect SharePoint to the rest of the world, but email works well enough in this case. People like email. People understand email. People can send email from almost anywhere using almost any device. Besides, the goal isn’t to show off our SharePoint prowess, the goal is to make life easy. I think I’ll go walk me some steps.

2 thoughts on “SharePoint Joinery

  1. I built something similar last year on SharePoint. It had leaderboards to show individuals and their teams. It ran over 8 weeks. An event receiver was built to identify people (without them typing in their names each day) and calculate the points for the activities (walking/running, cycling and swimming). There was 500 people using it at one stage. Note, we had a consultant developer who built the event receiver, it wasn’t me!
    But it was problematic. Overall it worked but a lot of effort went into it.

    • Thanks for stopping by and sharing a comment. We are way too small to spend money on this, so we have to resort to done work arounds. That sounds pretty cool though. Sometimes I wish in was in a larger environment but small has its benefits too.

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