Blah blah InfoPath blah blah

imageWow, has anything ever attracted as much attention as Microsoft’s decision to kill a mediocre product? My inbox is full of “InfoPath is Dead” and “Microsoft is Killing InfoPath” emails. I’ve seen Tweets, Facebook posts, invitations to join discussions on LinkedIn and invitations to attend Webinars practically every single day since the announcement was made. I get it! InfoPath will die in 2023. Guess what, I will retire before then.

The fact that I will be retired before then really won’t be considered as input to our decisions regarding InfoPath usage. As it stands today, we are making limited use of InfoPath in a fairly important project. In addition, we have plans to use InfoPath in a slightly larger, more important project later this year. I don’t see us changing these plans. Here’s why:

2023 – 2014 = 9 Years – Seriously, 9 years! That’s a long time. It’s not like “ding dong the witch is dead; click your shoes and go home.” The metaphorical Dorothy will be old enough to drink by the time she gets back to Kansas. We made an investment in InfoPath, and well before 2023, we will have achieved a return on that investment. That is what we are supposed to do isn’t it?

What’s on Other Roadmaps? – I realize that there are other ways to publish and process forms. Some of these alternatives are every bit as good as InfoPath, many are superior. If you made me choose a new forms platform today, I would probably start by taking a hard look at Nintex. We use Nintex’s workflow product and I imagine their form product works well too. That said, what’s Nintex’s plan for the future? Will Nintex Forms exist in 2023? Will the forms we produce with Nintex Forms today still run in 2023? Well, we really don’t know. In terms of vendors you can trust for the long haul, there really aren’t many. It’s not like they are untrustworthy, but what company can really say that they and their products will be here in 10 years? HP? Dell? BlackBerry (RIM)? Kodak? Go back 10 years and think about how those guys looked at the time and then consider how they look today. If you’ve been reading this blog, you might be surprised to see me say that I trust Microsoft, but when they say that they put something on a long, supported slide to the back door, I think we can believe them.

Now, let’s take a look at those scary emails. Here are some of the things they are warning me about and why I’m not concerned:

Support and Compatibility Questions Abound – Sure they do, but when haven’t they? Microsoft says that InfoPath 2013 will be the last version and support will end in April of 2023. As far as I know, they didn’t actually say that InfoPath 2013 and SharePoint 20nn will be compatible, but I’m not going to worry about that. Let’s assume that the next version of SharePoint is the 2016 version (I know they want to stop the “big release thing” but humor me). Chances are good that SharePoint 2016 will be compatible with InfoPath 2013. Chances are also good that we could run SharePoint 2016 until 2020 (we’re still running SharePoint 2010). Since we know that InfoPath is on a collision course with the trash bin in 2023, I’m pretty sure that my successors will have an alternative in mind before 2020. I don’t think they will be building any new InfoPath Forms in 2018-2020, but I think we can safely build them in 2014-2016 and still get that ROI.

No Certain Migration Path – In other words what if Microsoft creates a new Forms product and we can’t convert our InfoPath forms to that product. Well, that would be dumb. If Microsoft wants to play in the forms arena, they would be silly to alienate their previous forms customers. Still, since we know that Microsoft is capable of doing dumb things, I’ll accept this as a possibility. On the other hand, you have to ask: is there a way to migrate one forms product today to another forms product today? I am assuming that if we wanted to move to Nintex Forms today, we’d be recreating the functionality of our InfoPath forms on that platform. That’s OK. Also, that’s really the worst thing that can happen to us, that in 5-7 years we will have to recreate a form that probably will be due for a major update anyway.

A member of my team will be at the SharePoint Conference. We will hear about the future of InfoPath from the horse, and we will plan or adjust our plans accordingly. In the meantime, I’m not losing any sleep.

5 thoughts on “Blah blah InfoPath blah blah

  1. Picture – That’s one of my bookcases. Among other things, it’s packed with books on programming languages, development techniques, databases and design methodologies. The Twizzlers probably have a longer shelf life than some of the technology and the bag of rags is the only thing I can count on to be truly useful in the future.

  2. Eminently logical, Captain.

    I don’t get the hubbub, either. As I mentioned in our email conversation about this, just because Microsoft stops “supporting” something doesn’t mean it’s not still useful to some of us. Plus, there’s that whole nine years thing.

    M.

    • Thanks Marc. Of course there is a little irony now, given that we’re using InfoPath to help replace an application running in Lotus Notes (which is still going). Don’t ever ask me what horse you should bet on.

  3. I’ve never considered it a mediocre product. I have done quite well with the tool. Yes I would rather see improvements since I’ve invested so much time and knowledge with it, But then I also did that with DOS. I can still manage change pretty well (Although Windows 8 has been really trying my patience). Cheers

    Bismarck

Comments are closed.