Platform Jacking

I first heard the term Newsjacking used by David Meerman Scott. In fact he may have invented the term. That doesn’t surprise me. I have heard David speak several times, and he has been so far ahead of the curve that the future appeared to be a straight line.

I hope that’s enough homage to @dmscott for him to look the other way as I borrow his term and mangle it. I simply couldn’t think of a better way to describe what happens when a company moves in to exploit a hole in what should be another product’s / company’s domain. Think about the way Google stepped into fill the void Apple left when they decided to stop using Google Maps (in favor of their not nearly as accurate maps). Now, instead of Google being passed by, this may have evolved into a normal competition, but that’s a subject for someone else’s blog.

Microsoft, in my opinion has been jacked on at least two (maybe 3) occasions. OK, here’s the difference between me and David Meerman Scott and my blog and a blog written by an analyst – ‘my opinion’ is based on my experience and that’s all. Here are my three candidates:

MaaS360 – Back in the days when we were eagerly awaiting the first beta of SharePoint 2010, I was listening to a presentation by a Microsoft employee who suggested that one of the features of SP2010 would be a way to tunnel into SharePoint without VPN – Something Microsoft does with both Exchange and Lync via an edge Server. Those two features were a tremendous boon to our operation, and left most of our employees not even needing VPN connections on their laptops. If we had that ability for SharePoint, I could forget how to spell VPN, but we don’t. Once again, if we actually do, please explain it to me in a comment and I’ll buy you a beer if we ever meet in person.

Anyway, what I don’t think Microsoft does for my laptop, they clearly don’t do for my iPhone or my iPad – but MaaS360 does. If you’re not familiar with MaaS360, it’s a mobile device management app which allows companies to control mobile access at a very granular level. In addition, there is the MaaS360 Browser that talks to its counterpart server and provides seamless access to SharePoint from my iPhone. We are now planning to build out a collection of nice mobile pages so our employees will have access to SharePoint from their iPhone/iPads without VPN.

Harmon.ie – By far the best example of filling a void is Harmon.ie, the product that fills the chasm between Exchange and SharePoint so brilliantly that I no longer want Microsoft to build the feature into either server. Harmon.ie’s product is so cool, and so robust that I needed a term like Platform Jacking to describe it – some of our employees literally work out of Outlook and the Harmon.ie sidebar as if SharePoint doesn’t even exist. SharePoint, in these cases has simply become the invisible conduit to the even more invisible SQL Server.

I’ve written about Harmon.ie before, but a reader recently asked me to review Harmon.ie’s iPad app. OK, so we have to go back to that whole “not an analyst” thing. Giving a review sort of implies that I know something about Harmon.ie’s competitors – I don’t. Someone on my staff used to, but then we purchased Harmon.ie and we stopped caring about alternatives. Here are a couple of reasons why we still don’t care:

Harmon.ie works – You might be surprised to hear “it works” used as a differentiating statement for products, but it can be. Some products don’t work, or they don’t work as advertised. Harmon.ie works, and if you every find and area where it doesn’t, they will fix it fast.

Harmon.ie fills many holes – Harmon.ie started by filling the hole between Exchange and SharePoint and Lotus Notes and SharePoint. Then, they released Harmon.ie for the iPad and I had a way to connect my Exchange email with SharePoint on my iPad that looked and felt very similar to the way I connect these two essential products on my desktop. Now, I see that Harmon.ie has been released for the OWA client for Office 365. These guys are always one step ahead of demand.

WebEx – I recently received a new laptop at work. Somewhere during the lifespan of my old laptop, we switched to WebEx for hosting public meetings. Check out the picture at the top – That’s from my desktop, and WebEx has attached itself to my Lync client as if to remind me that Lync doesn’t work so well for public meetings. WebEx is jacking Lync right on Microsoft’s front lawn.

5 thoughts on “Platform Jacking

  1. Dan, I am way flattered by this very cool riff: “I have heard David speak several times, and he has been so far ahead of the curve that the future appeared to be a straight line.” Thank you! I didn’t coin “newsjacking” but I certainly popularized the term because of my book by that title. Good for you to use the phrase Platform Jacking! I’m always up for people to jack my stuff. Take care, David

  2. Pingback: It’s Alive | SharePoint Stories

  3. Pingback: SharePoint Joinery | SharePoint Stories

Comments are closed.