Maybe, Just Maybe

clip_image002I’ve been on vacation this past week, trying to put great distance between my thoughts and thoughts of SharePoint. I have spent most of the week doing what I love to do – woodworking and construction. Both hobbies give me the opportunity to build things and to use some pretty cool tools. Ironically, the opportunity to use some pretty cool tools brought my thoughts back to SharePoint. The manager of our small group has installed a trial of Nintex Workflow and due to some budget magic we might actually be able to afford this product this year. Our tasks are to determine two things: 1) can we get by without the Enterprise Edition (if you’re new to Microsoft or SharePoint, ‘enterprise’ is the word they use in Seattle when they mean ‘expensive’) and 2) is there enough utility in this product to justify the expense.

We have been drooling over this product for a long time, but our desire rose dramatically after listening to Marcel Meth talk about it at an AIIM New England event last November. We like products like this because we like adding functionality to SharePoint but we don’t like writing a lot of code. I have only started poking around (I am on vacation) but I’ve seen ‘Calculate Date’ and ‘Regular Expression’ categories and I have wanted those for quite some time. I also noticed ‘For Each’ and ‘Loop’ and that makes me think I can stop writing those three-cushion bank shots to force SharePoint to iterate over a list by updating an unrelated ‘index list’. I know that Microsoft has added looping to SharePoint Designer 2013 but we’re still using 2010, and I’m guessing Nintex’s implementation will shine a little brighter than Microsoft’s.

In addition to looking ahead to SharePoint 2013, we are also looking at the possibility that we will one day want to move SharePoint to the cloud. As we invest in tools, we want to be careful to work with vendors who are also looking to the future. Nintex seems to have that same view, so I think we are safe in that regard.

The main reason we look at solutions like this is because we want to be able to move activity into SharePoint. Content management is more than storing documents. Documents often get created through a collaborative process. Once created, documents sometimes cause other processes to start. The notion of content-centric applications is one that we are very keen on seeing come to fruition, and we want that to happen within SharePoint. We have had some success building solutions that let documents get created, be processed through a basic life-cycle and move to become company records, but we want to be able to handle complex processes as well.

I’m not sure if we’re going to pull the trigger on this purchase, the price is high. Being in the insurance industry, we are grounded in the concept of necessary volume or critical mass – a.k.a. there has to be enough premium income to cover the potential risk. Similarly with this product, we have to see enough utility to justify the cost. In making that determination, we will consider:

How much time will this product save? Let’s face it; we could probably do most of this in client-side code so this product has to make accomplishing our goals easier.

How often will we use it? This is really the volume question. Even if owning Nintex will reduce our development effort by 75%, if we only use it twice a year it won’t be worth the investment.

Is Nintex critical to anything? Some products are justifiable simply because, when you need to do “X” it’s the only way to get it done. I doubt we are going to find anywhere where Nintex is the silver bullet, but we should look.

If the evaluation is positive, I’m sure that I will write about our experience with the product.

Have a great Labor Day weekend; I’m going back on vacation now.

6 thoughts on “Maybe, Just Maybe

  1. Picture – Those are “Helping Hands” and they are a great addition to any toolbox. They meet all three of my criteria. 1) They save a ton of time that would be spent rigging up other means of support. 2) I use them often and 3) My wife isn’t going to hold things in place while I run to the hardware store.

  2. I figured that I should say it so you didn't have to. I do know that, and it is an important consideration. It comes down to where do you want to deploy your resources. Right now, we have the ability to build great "systems" because we have great people who understand our business model (something I can't buy easily). I'm hoping I can build those systems faster.

  3. Thanks Aaron. We have looked at the forums. I like the fact that there seems to be a large community around Nintex – that's important.

  4. No debate that you may be able to do things faster, and the graphical nature of the interface may be helpful with your end users as well. It's nice to have options, though!M.

Comments are closed.