Lightning Conductor Web Part

New Haven RailroadA while back, I suggested that I wasn’t worried about the changes that Microsoft was making / has made to SharePoint because the market would come to our rescue. The pronoun here is referring to those of us who had gotten used to wiring up Data View Web Parts and customizing pages in SharePoint Designer. The collective changes in SharePoint 2013 will make building those solutions a different exercise and one that brings us closer to programming than my staff wants to be. I’ll save until later the philosophical debate(s) around whether script-coding is programming; whether programming is evil and to be avoided or a necessary skill that should be required, and whether JavaScript is the official language of the new world order and we should all just suck-it-up. Today, I want to point out one vendor that has stepped into the role I outlined last October.

We have been previewing the Lightning Conductor Web Part from Lightning Tools and I am happy to report that it looks like it can easily help us provide one of the solutions that we used to turn to XSL to provide – the custom view of data from places our users don’t want to go. OK, it’s not that they don’t want to go there; they just don’t want to be on the road forever. The people using SharePoint in our company don’t really want to use SharePoint to conduct business; they want SharePoint to work for them. We made a promise to those people years ago when we (Information Services) chose SharePoint; we said that we would invest time and budget into making SharePoint easy to use. I take that promise very seriously. If I start telling people “you have to learn a lot more about SharePoint in order to have it help you with that task…” I’m practicing bait and switch. This new tool is pretty cool, and it appears to be a really good use of my budget. So, what does this tool actually do? Well, I can’t describe this any better than the Lightning Tools website, but here’s what we like about it:

Using the tool, we can quickly put a web part on a page that aggregates content from multiple libraries on the site, from within the site collection, from within multiple site collections or from across our entire farm. We can filter this content, we can sort this content and we can decide what columns to include. We can do all of this from within the browser, without opening SharePoint Designer and without even leaving the page that we want to put the web part on. Configuration is fast, and the results are immediate. And, if we screw it up, we can simply delete the part without having messed up the entire page.

For example, we will be able to gather policies, underwriting correspondence, inspection reports, engineering metrics, previous claims and presentations given to any one of our customers, on any page on our farm. These documents (someday will) all reside in the sites where they belong, but I (will be able to) pull them together – without waiting for a search to complete – wherever they might be useful. Parenthetical expressions aside, we already have content in multiple locations that needs to be aggregated to be more useful.

Of course there are a lot of other ways to accomplish these tasks. I have watched lots of people demonstrate various techniques at seminars and, inspired by those demos, I urged my team to learn these techniques. These days, I want my team building solutions. I want them to show off their content and information management prowess, not their syntax skills. The people on my team can imagine great solutions by merging their understanding of SharePoint, content management and the unique attributes of our crazy little business. If I can buy tools like this to let them quickly build what they can imagine, it seems like a good move.

I think we are moving forward with this purchase We just purchased this product! We had a few questions during our evaluation, and they were quickly answered by the responsive service group at Lightning Tools.

Let me dwell on that last thought for a second. I love it when a vendor lets you work with the actual technical support group during a sales evaluation. Not only did we get our answers, we were able to evaluate the support as well. BTW, the support is as good as the product.

The Lightning Conductor looks like a nice fit for us, but I’ll fill you in on our actual experience after we put it to use. Maybe I’ll get one of my team members to write about and I’ll get a week off – this is sounding better and better.

One thought on “Lightning Conductor Web Part

  1. Picture – Lots of conductors here, including one or two on the train 😉 This is my favorite train, the old New Haven Railroad. I love the colors and the logo. Sadly, it’s no longer operating but Metro North keeps several locos on the tracks.

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