Is This Right

clip_image002Last week, I was talking about accuracy. This week, I learned that there is something more important than accuracy – confidence. We have been working on the design of a SharePoint solution that is both simple and complicated at the same time. Of course, we are concerned about accuracy, but the people using our system will have to feel confident that they have selected the information that they need. This isn’t a challenging SharePoint problem; this is a design issue, a usability issue and ultimately an adoption issue.

Our project involves a contact list. That’s simple, but it’s really about 10 contact lists, and since they need to be exposed on both an internal and an Internet-facing server, it’s really 20 contact lists. The “master” list is a group of people who serve on a variety of committees, and that’s the only list we want to maintain. The people come and go and the committee membership changes from year-to-year. We need to know who is on each committee today, we need to know who was on each committee 2, 3, 5 and perhaps 10 years ago, and we need to know this from multiple angles. For example, I might simply want to be able to contact the members of Committee A. On the other hand, if I’m about to meet one of the people on the list, I might want to know every committee he or she serves on. In yet another scenario, if a person is retiring, I might want to know every committee the person ever served on. We’ve cracked the list design issues, and with the help of HarePoint Workflow Extensions, we’ve cracked how to keep the lists in sync on the Internet-facing server. OK, so what is this confidence issue?

Let’s think about those scenarios again. In the first one, I want to see the names of the people who are currently serving on Committee A. Obviously, I could simply filter the list on a few columns to distill the contents down to right group. That would work, but while most people know how to do this, they don’t want to have to do it every time; that’s what views are for. Views, now this is where we start to get into trouble with usability.

Views are a fantastic feature within SharePoint, but neither lists nor views scale very well. That’s not to say that you can’t put a ton of items in a list, or create a bunch of views, but sooner than later the results are untrustworthy. Once you get a couple of pages of items in a list, you have to resort to sorting or filtering to make it useful. Similarly, once you have 15 or 20 views on a list, the selection is equally unmanageable; in fact, a large selection of views might even be worse than a large collection of items. When I am setting sort and filter parameters, I know what I am doing; the trouble is that I have to be able to imagine the results as I proceed. When I choose a view, I am relying on someone’s ability to name a list intelligently. If I make the user figure out how to get the information they want, I put the burden of accuracy on them and it becomes a confidence issue.

There’s a very fine line between wanting my users to understand SharePoint and forcing them into a situation where they are uncomfortable. When they get to that point, they are going to ask someone else (maybe me) to get them the information they need, and at that point SharePoint and I have failed.

We have to find a way to tame a large list that can be rendered in a large number of ways. I can’t just substitute a bunch of input fields for a search or data view web part, that’s really no different than asking them to configure the raw list. I need to give them links and simple binary selections, coupled with a standard output format so they remain confident that they are getting what they want. Links like “Committee A Members” with a choice for “Current members only” or “Most recent five years” or “2000 – Present”. The output should be simple: Contact name (with a link to details), his or her role on the committee and the company they work for. I would argue that this kind of solution is the poster child for “perfect is the enemy of good enough” – making this process more elaborate, or the making the results fancier will only erode the confidence of the average user.

The simplest contact list that we have ever prepared, is rendered from our annual Policyholder Meeting survey, it’s a dirt-simple list: “Who’s Golfing on Thursday”, and it’s an absolute favorite among my coworkers.

One thought on “Is This Right

  1. Picture referenceWho hasn’t used a spirit level? I have lots of levels, including some that have digital readouts and can be programmed to tell me the exact slope of a board, but this is the one I usually reach for. It’s accurate, and it is so easy to use that I am always confident in the result. Here, it’s being used to check the level of a entrance area deck I’m building on our house. If you want to see more pictures from that project, check out this set on Flickr http://flic.kr/s/aHsjCE1Znv

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