The Market Will Save Us

clip_image002I just finished reading a blog post by Sahil Malik which refers to a blog post by Marc Anderson and other posts and comments on the subject of the soon-to-be-gone-but-not-forgotten design view in SharePoint 2013. I have followed this story from the beginning when Marc was hinting that the design view was missing, up to and now well beyond, the seemingly official death sentence that was published by the Microsoft SharePoint Team on their blog. That the design view is going, going, gone seems certain at this point, but whether that will result in a wave of power users learning the art and craft of development or just skyrocketing demand for existing developers is not so clear. I can only say with clarity what will happen in my little world – nothing.

I should rephrase that “nothing will happen right away” and by “nothing” I mean SharePoint 2013. It won’t land here at least until this time next year because activity is underway that relies on the work that members of my team are performing in SharePoint Designer, using design view. Those projects will be completed and an annual event that depends on some custom Data View Web Parts that we assemble will be supported on SharePoint 2010 as it has for the previous two years. Switching canoes in the middle of this stream isn’t appealing and it won’t happen. This isn’t going to hurt Microsoft, (unless SharePoint 2013 marketing success depends on posts in this blog) because we have SharePoint under Software Assurance.

While people are lining up to prognosticate as to which way companies will go (developer of just plain SharePoint) I have faith that good old marketplace economics will save the day. Somebody will build a tool or an add-on tool for something like Dreamweaver, to once again empower the end-users and designers to push SharePoint beyond the limits of its dumpy box. If that doesn’t happen, then other market forces will bear down on the situation and other platforms may benefit from this decision. Again, I can’t speak for the market, or the broad content management / collaboration community, but if I have to turn developers loose on an ECM solution, I’m going to take a hard look at Nuxeo before I start buying more copies of Visual Studio.

Of course, I probably don’t even have to go that far. Before watching Marc Anderson deftly build a Data View Web Part using j-this, j-that and SPServices, I was using Ruby and Dreamweaver to put the information I wanted in a Web Part. I certainly prefer the approach Marc taught my crew, but I can always revert to other options. In fact, I may not have to revert to Ruby; much of what we display in Data View Web Parts can be rendered by SQL Server Reporting Services, another technology my crew is adept at using. Then again, the market may save the day in other ways. When I was using Ruby, I coupled it with Dreamweaver because someone had written a Dreamweaver extension for working with RHTML. I’m willing to bet that there are way more SharePoint power users than there are Ruby developers so I wouldn’t be surprised to see a solution become available for building the kind of solutions that we continue to need in SharePoint from a different development starting point.

Microsoft may want SharePoint to look like SharePoint, and as I have said before on this blog, I support that to a degree. The more SharePoint solutions share a common look and feel, the easier it is for people using SharePoint to move from one solution to another. Still, sometimes what you need isn’t in the box. When intelligent and enterprising people are confronted by the absence of the things they need, they find them elsewhere or they figure out how to build them. When enough people start building things, vendors bring tools to the market. Maybe Stanley will come out with the Fat Max Editor for SharePoint – I would buy that in a heartbeat.

2 thoughts on “The Market Will Save Us

  1. Stanley should make a Fat Max for everything. I would like a Stanley Fat Max Hair Dryer, a Stanley Fat Max Coffeemaker, a Stanley Fat Max Washing Machine…then everything would always work and last forever.

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