HarePoint

clip_image002One of the things that I like most about managing a small technology shop is the agility with which we can operate. We are constrained by the usual suspects, i.e. the limits of technology, budgets and time; but most decisions are easy. If we like something, we can look at it. If we like it after we look at it, we can buy it (we usually don’t look at the stuff we can’t afford) and if we have to install something to a server or change a database, we can do that too. Long term readers of this blog know that I like to write about the good people we work with, whether they have developed an add-on product or have rolled up their sleeves and helped us to build something. One of the companies I have wanted to write about is HarePoint, but I wanted to wait until we could use their product to solve one of our most vexing problems – that day has come!

I learned about HarePoint several months ago when I was looking for better ways to work with dates in SharePoint workflows. While poking around their website, I discovered this list of Workflow Extensions. Some of the extensions looked pretty cool, including the ability to work with arrays, and those for manipulating lists, libraries and individual documents and images. By the time I read about the ability to execute a SQL Query from within a workflow, I was starting to drool a little. All of the extensions seemed cool, but one that really piqued our interest was the ability to move a document to a different library. That feature may sound like kid stuff, but it’s not as simple as it appears. We wanted to copy a document, along with some of its metadata from a document library on our internal farm, to a library in a site on our Internet-facing farm. We asked the people at HarePoint if their extensions could do that and they thought that they could. Unfortunately, our first attempt failed.

Some of the best vendors we work with have distinguished themselves when things didn’t work – HarePoint is now a member of that club. We told them what we were trying to do. We told them that it didn’t work, and we anticipated being told that, in retrospect, the feature wasn’t designed to move documents between farms. Instead, the support crew at HarePoint told us that they thought this would be a good feature to have, and they worked with us to make it work. It took a couple of attempts, but last week we were able to create a workflow that moves a document from a library in our engineering site to a library on our Internet-facing SharePoint server.

This isn’t just an interesting technical challenge; this is the final piece of an intricate puzzle that was mostly assembled over a year ago. You can read a ton about that project by searching this blog for ‘inspection’, but the short story goes like this: When our engineers write an inspection report, a series of SharePoint workflows marshal the reports through various reviews, updates a variety of metadata and stores a final copy of the report in a Records Library. The final step was always supposed to have been to create a copy of the report for our customers to access in a SharePoint site we provide for them, but that has remained a manual process – until today. We successfully tested moving one of these inspection reports from our library to a target library on our test farm. The problem seems to have been solved, and the implementation couldn’t be easier:

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I want to publically acknowledge the technical support and development groups at HarePoint. The company has a great product, and these people went the extra-mile to make it even better. I’d also like to acknowledge the members of my staff who did battle with the ever present nemesis in SharePoint (permissions) to put these awesome capabilities to work. If you’re looking for ways to extend the functionality of your workflow-driven SharePoint solutions, you might want to take a hard look at HarePoint.

3 thoughts on “HarePoint

  1. Thanks for the glowing feedback about Harepoint, it seems they went above and beyond the call of duty to help you move documents between farms.

  2. Thanks for reading and commenting Laura. Their tech-support has been very responsive on a number of issues. There are so many variables with a SharePoint installation that I'm sure it's impossible to test for everything. They seem to be driven to get it right.

  3. Picture referenceThat’s the Thunderbolt, the best wooden roller coaster at Kennywood Park, but when I was a little kid that was the Pippin. Just about the time that I was tall enough to ride the Pippin, Kennywood designers turned it into the Thunderbolt by adding several thrilling features. Taking something that is already very good, and making it better is how good companies stay good. Kennywood has always taken this approach, and they’ve been around for over 110 years!

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