Head Bone Connected to the Neck Bone

imageRemember that song, Dem Bones? All those connections, from toes to head and back again; it was a fun way to think about our skeleton, and as long as I don’t hear my doctor humming it, it’s a fond memory. As it turns out, connections have continued to play an important role in my life. With respect to my skeleton, it’s the connections that caused the problems that sent me to physical therapy. With respect to people, it’s the connections that allow me to enjoy life, and get my job done. With respect to SharePoint, well, sometimes connections in SharePoint help us do remarkable things, and sometimes they send me looking for therapy.

Recently, we have been experimenting with the various ways we can connect SharePoint to the structured data in our SQL Server. There are two primary reasons for wanting to exploit this capability. One, we can enhance the value of our content-centric applications on SharePoint when we can add bits of data to the picture. Two, sometimes, processes in SharePoint grow until they reach the threshold of being an application; nudging them over that threshold saves us the effort of developing another application. Here are two examples of the connections we are working on right now, and why:

One of our most complex content-centric applications is the solution that helps our engineers manage the documents associated with their loss-control inspections. The solution relies on a few supporting custom lists. For example, one list includes, among other things, the URL of the document library in the customer’s site on our Internet-facing server so we know where to put their copy of the report. Recently, a manager in our underwriting department asked if the underwriters can be notified when inspection reports are distributed. Of course, they could set alerts on these libraries, but they only want to know when one document reaches its final stage in the process. Since there is a workflow running, and a lookup-list, we could easily add the underwriter to that list and shoot him an email. Then again, underwriter assignments change, and those assignments are already being maintained in our policy rating system. Instead of manually duplicating that information in the look-up list, the workflow, with a little help from a function library that we are testing, can look up the underwriter in the rating system. If this library doesn’t work, the workflow can look up the underwriter in an External List rendered from the table in question; that would be duplicate data but not duplicate work, SharePoint would be doing the heavy lifting.

The second example features one of our earliest (and ongoing) workflow driven success stories, a time tracking solution that our attorneys use. Our first step was to automate the time entry, which relies on a series of related custom lists. For example, we use a custom list to let the attorneys identify which projects are active. By toggling that status, the pick lists in the entry forms are modified to only show valid choices. The evolution of this solution included a hand-crafted set of Data View Webparts to let the attorneys enter their time from their iPads and integrated SSRS reports to provide the summary data to the accountants. Of course, the accountants need to turn that summary data into journal entries. The time-honored method has been to read the report and type the entries into our General Ledger system. Starting next month, SharePoint will be making those journal entries, courtesy of some fancy script work by Marc Anderson, aided by the woman on my team who has guided this solution through its various stages. The last stage was not without a certain amount of drama. We ran into trouble trying to update an External List from the script. Perhaps the capability doesn’t exist, perhaps the feature is broken, perhaps we still didn’t manage to get the permissions right. However we can update the External List from a workflow. So, Marc put his journal entries into a SharePoint list and a workflow puts them into SQL Server via the External List. It sounds like a kludge, but it works well and it doesn’t require any additional input during the process. I do hope that at some point, Marc describes the details behind his middle-tier magic over on his blog; I’ll leave it at “it works, and we love it!

Web Parts, Data sources, External Lists, related SharePoint lists; it’s not as easy as “the toe bone connecting to the foot bone”, but it’s actually not that hard. As I mentioned last week, we keep these solutions moving forward by taking small steps – sometimes we fail and learn, but sometimes we succeed.

9 thoughts on “Head Bone Connected to the Neck Bone

  1. Deborah, Thanks for reading and thanks for pointing us toward another possibility. We have looked into a lot of options, but SSIS hasn't been one yet. This sounds like a pretty capable solution – thanks again!D

  2. Picture infoMeet Mr. Bones, the skeleton hanging my orthopedics’examination room while I was being treated for a shoulder injury. The connections that were causing problems in this case involved nerves and soft-tissue that were being “impinged” between bones. As I understand medicine, and most other sciences, when soft stuff meets hard stuff, soft stuff loses.

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