Taking the Next Step

imageIf you follow this blog, or even if you drop in from time to time, you know two things about our SharePoint implementation – we have had some success, and much work remains. Given that situation, this might not seem like the time to be more aggressive with our SharePoint goals, but I think it is. I want to build on the success we have had; I want to extend our reach into other areas of our business, while also expanding the number of ways that we can take advantage of SharePoint.

Lately, we have been working to find something in between the boring out-of-the-box look and feel of SharePoint and a totally custom solution. We want to avoid recreating, as Owen Baern said: “The Problem SharePoint Solved”, but we are trying to give our users the experience they deserve. I am also trying to save time and money by extending SharePoint into the realm previously dominated by fat-client desktop applications. During the past 10 months, we have had some good success building off the lessons we learned during a training session last year with Marc D. Anderson, but as the title suggests, it was time to move the bar. Last year, we learned a lot about working with Data View Web Parts and script, and we used that knowledge to build a couple of very cool summary analysis pages (dashboards if you prefer buzzwords). This year, we wanted to get started with Marc’s SPServices library, so we had him take us to school again.

I have seen a large number of shout-out’s and thank you’s to Marc on Twitter about SPServices, but we really hadn’t come up with a reason to use it, until a couple of months ago. Having split our Internet-facing server into several site collections, we wanted a way to intelligently share items from a master list at the root level of the farm. The list contains employee contact information, including relational items so we can assign them to the sites we insure, the committees of our Board of Directors, and the business partners we deal with. All of these assignments are made by role, so an insured knows who the underwriter is, who the engineer(s) are and who to call for technical support. We have done this in the past with a separate master list in each site collection, using views or DVWPs, but we wanted a single list, so the people who maintain the contact information didn’t have to bounce around between sites. We also wanted the list to be easy to load on each/any page, and we wanted it to look good.

Marc quickly put us on the road to success, with a simple extract of data from the master list, displayed in a Content Editor Webpart that had that familiar SharePoint look and feel. We were impressed, but then Marc put us on the highway, making the list look a little better and driving its contents dynamically from the page it was on. I dropped that link on a test page, in a different site collection, and it sprang to life with the appropriate data. Next, Marc put us on a Trans-AM course, when he used his library’s feature to return a JSON array, so that we could group the results in a way that made sense to our customers, as opposed to the way they were returned by the query. image

Some of our insureds operate multiple reactor sites and there may be numerous underwriters and/or engineers assigned to the account. In those cases, we wanted the account staff to be grouped by insured site, but we wanted the technical staff only listed once. For single unit locations, we wanted the team listed without any grouping or at least with the single group opening in an expanded state.

As Marc worked his middle-tier magic, we got the clear impression that he could put us on a Formula-1 course if we wanted to go that far – we didn’t. We want a good user experience, but we still wanted our users to know they were in SharePoint. This is the point when I am glad we teamed up with Marc. He didn’t come here with a solution in search of a problem; he didn’t walk in trying to sell us the same approach he used at his last client, or his favorite approach, in fact, he ended up trying something new. He came to teach, and he taught us how to do what we wanted to be able to do. If we ever need help building a solution, he’s the first person I would call. This time around it was a learning event, and it was a total success.

One thought on “Taking the Next Step

  1. In an effort to solve the "what's that a picture of" problem, I am going to add the description as a comment before moving on. That’s my daughter Faith, but she wasn’t just posing for a picture, she was teaching me how to use my camera. She is a photographer, and when she heard me bemoaning that the picture I took didn’t look like view I had, she took it upon herself to help me capture the look I wanted. Her feet might have been blue by the time I took about 25 pictures, but I got what I was looking for. She started by urging me into “Manual” mode and as I described each shot, she suggested changes to the various settings. Sometimes, you need a guide. This is a link to her photographs from that hike. Here is a link to mine, which includes a few shots of her taking those pictures.

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