Simple My Site Success

I am a member of Toastmasters, the organization dedicated to improving public speaking skills. A speech in Toastmasters is typically 5 – 7 minutes long, organized with a particular goal in mind and evaluated and monitored by audience members. The speech goals and objectives are outlined in a manual. Every speaker gets two types of feedback. First, there’s a statistical report – how close you came to the target time, how many times you used “ah” “um” and other crutch words and any grammatical mistakes you made.

The second bit of feedback is your evaluation. Each speaker is assigned an evaluator who, following a checklist in the manual, offers commentary on what you did well and what you need to work on.

I write my speeches ahead of time to help practice and I store them in My Site. I took advantage of the fact that SharePoint lets you add columns to a document library. I added columns to record what manual and project I used the speech for, when I delivered it, the time, the “ah-count”, audience reaction and the comments from my evaluation.

Nothing Earth shattering but turning static content into information is a powerful benefit of SharePoint.

Where are you finding benefit?

5 thoughts on “Simple My Site Success

  1. I find SP to be a pretty good “pull” medium. Unlike email which can “push” the recipient to a requested action by a certain time, an online collaboration tool like SP sits and waits for users to take purposeful actions–pulling them according to their degrees of project participation. So, I think that busy or insecure users will not tend to make frequent use of a tool like SP. These are the users whose voices are absent in the document revision records and in the discussion threads. It would be useful if SP had a built-in mechanism to let users see when all “participants” last visited a project document or status page. For continual “no-shows,” the only way to move a SP project forward with a semblance of consensus is to use a push message that, in so many words, would say “speak now or forever hold your peace.”

  2. That’s a good observation and timely. Earlier today I began a complex project that a lot of people have an interest in. I told them we would be tracking the project on a task list on SharePoint.During the day, I received several requests for an “email update” – I ignored those. At the end of the day, I sent out an email that said “much progress has been made, details are available on the SharePoint task list”Sometimes you have to draw the line in the sand.

  3. participation. So, I think that busy or insecure users will not tend to make frequent use of a tool like SP. These are the users whose voices are absent in the document revision records and in the disbosboscussion threads. It would be useful if SP had a built-in mechanism to let users see when all "participants" last visited a project document or status page. For continual "no-shows," the only way to move a SP project forward with a semblance of consensus is to use

  4. @sbobet – it might be possible to show that information in a Data View Web Part, although it would be confined to actions. If a person changed a document, updated a list, contributed to a discussion, etc. I don't know if it has happened in your experience, but In our shop, I know that we have people who contibute from the sidelines. They read documents and then, in a mentoring role, nudge others to take action. that would be hard to track.Thansk for reading and for sharing your thoughts.Dan

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